BREAKING: RNC Reince Priebus Alleges Wisconsin Voter Fraud! {VIDEO}


The chairman of the Republican National Committee claimed Tuesday that voter fraud in Wisconsin is far more pervasive than official reports have shown.

“I’m always concerned about voter fraud, you know, being from Kenosha, and quite frankly having lived through seeing some of it happen,” Reince Priebus said. “Certainly in Milwaukee we have seen some of it, and I think it’s been documented. Any notion that’s not the case, it certainly is in Wisconsin. I’m always concerned about it, which is why I think we need to do a point or two better than where we think we need to be, to overcome it.”

It’s not the first time Priebus has used strong language on the issue; late last year, he said on national television that Wisconsin was “riddled” with voter fraud.

At a Manitowoc campaign stop later Wednesday, Gov. Scott Walker said, “I don’t have any reason to agree or disagree” with Priebus’ comments.

“We have seen problems in the past in Wisconsin,” Walker said. “I don’t know what percentage to predict on that. I hope it’s none. I hope there is none. But certainly we’re cautious, and we want to make sure there are enough volunteers out there.”

SURPRISE!  PRIEBUS MADE THESE STATEMENTS ON MAY 30TH, 2012

EVERYONE SHARE THIS AND THROW IT IN HIS FACE!

Source: RNC chairman Priebus alleges rampant vote fraud

Priebus opinion article: A Priebus column published in June 2011 ALSO cited voter fraud -related allegations in several states.

Road to the Brokered Convention, Wisconsin ‘Cheesehead Revolution’ trio Ryan, Priebus and Walker, challenge Trump 


MADISON, Wis. (AP) — A trio of Wisconsin Republicans looking to inject the party with their own youthful, aggressive brand of conservatism ushered in the “Cheesehead Revolution.” Their aim was to position the GOP for success in the 2016 presidential election.

Then came Donald Trump.

 With the anti-Trump movement in full swing even as Trump solidifies his front-runner status in the presidential race, the focus turns to the April 5 primary in the home state of those three heavyweights: House Speaker Paul Ryan, Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus and Gov. Scott Walker.

They are trying to chart a course in the face of a revolt over Trump’s rise and what it means for the future of the Republican Party — and for each of them individually.

“The great plans came off the tracks with the presence of Donald Trump, both in terms of where the party would be and presidential ambitions,” said Democratic Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett, who ran against Walker twice and lost both times. “Donald Trump changed everything.”

The “Cheesehead Revolution,” as Walker and Priebus dubbed it, began in 2011. With Ryan rising in the House, Walker a new governor, and Priebus taking over the party apparatus, the trio then represented what looked to be a unified party in a swing state that could become a GOP stronghold in presidential races to come.

But in 2012, Mitt Romney lost to incumbent Barack Obama, with Ryan as his running mate. Priebus tried to steer the party in a more inclusive direction.

In 2013, he issued the “Growth and Opportunity Project,” aimed toward an immigration overhaul and outreach to minorities, and driven by the recognition that Hispanics in particular were rising as a proportion of the population.

Now that tract is known as an autopsy report.

The recommendations put Priebus at odds with more conservative Republicans. And now, two of the three remaining presidential candidates, Trump and Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, have built their campaigns not on trying to broaden the party by reaching out to Hispanics and minorities, but by appealing to evangelicals and more conservative white voters.

Source: The Seattle Times