The Lying Liberal Press Has Been Spreading #FakeNews About The Cost Of The MOAB. Surprised?


The giant bomb U.S. forces dropped Thursday on an ISIS training camp in Afghanistan did not cost $314 million to develop, or $16 million per unit as reported by multiple news outlets. Far from it, barely a fraction of that.

The bomb U.S. forced dropped Thursday on an ISIS training camp in Afghanistan cost U.S. taxpayers an estimated $170,000 per unit in 2003, but the Pentagon does not have an exact cost, according to an Air Force statement.

The Air Force’s cost estimate for the MOAB — the largest non-nuclear bomb ever detonated in combat — includes parts, labor, and contracted components, according to “an estimate put together at the time” MOAB was produced, Air Force spokeswoman Ann Stefanek told The Daily Caller News Foundation. The first MOAB bomb was made leading up to the Iraq war in 2003, and $170,000 spent that year would be closer to $227,000 today, adjusting for inflation.

Multiple news outlets reported Thursday that each Massive Ordnance Air Blast (MOAB), or Mother of All Bombs, bomb cost $16 million, with a total program cost of $314 million. Those figures were likely gleaned from a misreading of an Los Angeles Times article about a different bomb, and a questionable military asset website, The DCNF reported Thursday.

Every news report about cost of the “Mother of All Bombs” relied on a misreading of a 2011 article or a dubious internet website that InfoWars once linked to with a “healthy bit of skepticism.”

The actual cost of the bomb is unknown. The actual cost of the program isn’t publicly available because the Mother of All Bombs, officially known as GBU-43 or the Massive Ordinance Air Blast (MOAB), is manufactured by the military and not a private defense company.

In fact, the Air Force doesn’t even keep track of the per unit cost, nor the cost of the program as a whole, because it is not manufactured privately.

“We don’t have a cost per unit” for the MOAB, Air Force spokesperson Ann Stefanek told The Daily Caller News Foundation. “These munitions were produced in-house so we don’t have a standard procurement cost associated with them.”

The Air Force mostly used existing technologies and hardware for the first MOAB prototypes and never contracted out the full production of the bomb, so they did not need to itemize and add the cost of each weapon component, Stefanek told TheDCNF.

Many reports Thursday, including USA Today, the Washington ExaminerCNBC and others, claimed the MOAB cost $314 million to develop, citing a 2011 Los Angeles Times report.

The cost estimates in that article, however, only refer to the cost of the Air Force’s biggest bunker busting bomb, the 5,300 pound Massive Ordnance Penetrator (MOP), or GBU-57, which is built by private defense contractor Boeing Company. “At a total cost of about $314 million, the military has developed and ordered 20 of the GPS-guided bombs, called Massive Ordnance Penetrators,” the LA Times report says.

(Via AP) A strike by the largest non-nuclear weapon ever used in combat by the U.S. military killed 36 Islamic State group militants and left no civilian casualties, hitting a tunnel complex in the remote mountains of eastern Afghanistan, Afghan officials said Friday.

While the two bomb types are related, they serve different functions — the MOP is designed to destroy underground bunkers as deep as 200 feet below the surface, while the MOAP crushes everything on the surface within a wide radius. The MOAB, like its Daisy Cutter predecessor, can only be dropped out of a C-130 built by Lockheed Martin, and the MOP is deployed from the B-2, a Northrop Grumman aircraft.

Many news organizations, including TIME and CNBC, also cited Deagel.com, a site with extensive lists of weapons assets owned by multiple countries, which claims the MOAB costs $16 million per unit, the same amount as the reported cost of the MOP.

Deagel links to no source to verify its information. The site’s IP is registered to an address in Spain, and the most press they’ve received was for a 2015 prediction that the U.S. population would drop by more than 80 percent by 2025 due to an economic and cultural collapse. “The American collapse is set to be far worse than the Soviet Union’s one [sic],” the forecast said.

InfoWars wrote this disclaimer when it wrote up Deagel’s report: “…we publish this report with some hesitation and a healthy bit of skepticism, yet find it compelling enough given the current global environment that it may be of interest to readers.”

The Air Force did award at least one contract in the development of the bomb to Dynetics, a defense contractor headquartered in Huntsville, Ala., for design of the bomb’s guidance system for the relatively low sum of $35,000.

The MOAB replaced the Vietnam-era bomb known as the “Daisy Cutter,” but is far more powerful and boasts greater navigation capabilities than its predecessor.

Like the Daisy Cutter, the MOAB delivers a pressurized blast a few feet off the ground that crushes everything in a wide radius.

“What it does is basically suck out all of the oxygen and lights the air on fire,” Bill Roggio, senior fellow at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies, told Air Force Times. “It’s a way to get into areas where conventional bombs can’t reach.”

The Air Force Research Laboratory ordered design concepts for “a 21,000-pound weapon system called the Massive Ordnance Air Blast” in April 2002, according to a 2014 report Dynetics delivered to the Senate Committee on Appropriations.

Dynetics then partnered with the Air Force to build and test three prototypes of the MOAB on March 11, 2003. Anyone within 20 miles of Eglin Air Force Base in Florida that day would have been able to see a giant mushroom cloud on the horizon at 1 p.m.

Dynetics partnered with the Air Force laboratory to build three prototypes of the MOAB, one of which was tested on March 11, 2003. Anyone within 20 miles of Eglin Air Force Base in Florida that day would have been able to see a giant mushroom cloud on the horizon at 1 p.m. The Air Force conducted a second test later that year.

After the test, the Pentagon ordered the bombs, and Dynetics helped produce “more than 10 weapons and delivered them between April and May,” rapidly turning around the weapon just nine weeks after the first successful test.

The process happened so fast that technicians painted the MOAB John Deere green because that was “the only color available in the amount we needed,”said Robert Hammack, AFRL Munitions Directorate Munitions Fabrication Facility.

“Every technical glitch or roadblock we encountered was worked out,” Robert Hammack, who lead the design team for AFRL, said in an Air Force post about the history of the MOAB. “Our team was filled with engineers and other people with deeply important skill sets necessary to pull this off.”

The fact that the bomb was never used during the Iraq war doesn’t mean they didn’t have an effect, according to the Air Force. “The most amazing thing about MOAB is it’s the most powerful bomb ever built and has done its job — deterring the enemy — simply because they know about it,” Hammack said.

Source: The Daily Caller, et al via Google

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No, President Donald Trump is NOT Cutting Meals On Wheels, Not Even Close! Here’s The Facts…


mow fake stock

Let’s start with the basics. Contrary to fake news reports, President Trump is not eliminating funding for Meals on Wheels. He’s not even cutting it.

How do we know this? Meals on Wheels says so. A statement issued by Meals on Wheels America notes that 35% of the revenues at the 5,000 or so local Meals on Wheels programs come via the Older Americans Act Nutrition Program.

What Trump’s budget does propose is cutting is the corruption-prone Community Development Block Grant program, run out of Housing and Urban Development. Some, but not all, state and local governments use a tiny portion of that grant money, at their own discretion, to “augment funding for Meals on Wheels,” according to the statement.

On 15 March 2017, the web site Occupy Democrats published an article about a blueprint budget released by the Trump administration under the sensationalized title “Trump Just Announced Plan to End ‘Meals on Wheels’ for Seniors.”

The clickbait headline misled many readers into believing that President Trump had specifically proposed to eliminate Meals on Wheels, a service that delivers meals to individuals at home (primarily seniors) who are unable to purchase or prepare meals for themselves.

Most, in fact, “is from corporate and foundation grants, with individual contributions the second largest source.” Local MOW groups do rely much more on federal funding — but it comes from programs that Trump’s budget doesn’t cut.

President Trump’s blueprint budget does not mention or target Meals on Wheels, nor would the adoption of that budget spell the end of Meals on Wheels. Rather, the blueprint contained a section proposing the elimination of funding for the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) program.

The Federal Government has spent over $150 billion on this block grant since its inception in 1974, but the program is not well-targeted to the poorest populations and has not demonstrated results..

The Community Development Block Grand Program is used to fund a variety of community projects by providing grants to state and local governments, who then allocate the funds to city programs, of which Meals on Wheels is just one very small part.

Last year, for example, Rockland County, N.Y., sent $25,000 of its CDBG money to its local Meals on Wheels program — which amounted to less than 1% of that program’s budget.

Kennewick, Wash., directed $18,500 in CDBG funds to Senior Life Resources’ Meals on Wheels program in 2015, a year in which the charity got $13.3 million in total government grants.

Fairfield, Calif., gave its local Meals on Wheels $10,539 of CDBG money in 2015, after giving it $0 for the previous four years.

Meals on Wheels of Trenton, N.J., asked for $50,000 in community grant money last year, and got nothing. It received no grant money the year before, either..

According to the Meals on Wheels 2015 annual report, the majority of the national office’s funding (about 84%) comes from individual contributions, while only 3% comes from VARIOUS federal grants such as the CDBG program.

Most, in fact, is from corporate and foundation grants, with individual contributions the second largest source. Local MOW groups do rely much more on federal funding, but it comes from programs that Trump’s budget doesn’t cut.

Although President Trump’s blueprint budget specifically stated that it would eliminate the CDBG, local Meals on Wheels groups would still receive federal funding through the Older Americans Act.

All in all, some local Meals on Wheels groups will likely have to make up revenue shortfalls through alternative sources or cut back on their services if funding cuts are made to the CDBG program and HHS, but the national Meals on Wheels program itself won’t be shut down..

As it turns out, however, this fake budget-cutting story ended up revealing how programs like Meals on Wheels can survive without federal help.

As soon as the story started to spread, donations began pouring into Meals on Wheels. In two days, the charity got more than $100,000 in donations, 50 times more than they’d normally receive. Clearly, individuals are ready, willing and eager to support this program once they perceive a need.

Isn’t this how charity is supposed to work, with people donating their own time, money and resources to causes they feel are important, rather than sitting back and expecting the federal government to do it for them?

Source: meals on wheels fake news – Google Search

 

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Those Pesky Bankruptcies That Won’t Go Away – Let’s Clear The Air Once And For All


To start with, let’s lay out the bottom line facts. Trump has created 515 businesses and only 11 of them failed. that’s a 98.64% success rate. Let’s see YOU match that!

It’s time to get to the bottom of this “bankruptcy” issue.  “How can a person who has filed bankruptcy four times expect to be elected President of the United States?” “How is Donald Trump able to file for bankruptcy so many times?”

The answer is… “He didn’t.” Trump himself has never filed for bankruptcy. His corporations have filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy four times.

All of these bankruptcies were connected to over-leveraged casino and hotel properties in Atlantic City, all of which are now operated under the banner of Trump Entertainment Resorts. Again, so you will understand, he has never filed for personal bankruptcy, an important distinction when considering his ability to emerge relatively unscathed, at least financially.

But to those uninitiated in bankruptcy laws, four instances of corporate bankruptcy in a row can seem staggering. “To the ordinary person in the street, it may seem surprising, but certainly not to me,” said Reed Smith partner Michael Venditto, who has represented clients in high profile Chapter 11 cases, including bankrupt airline TWA. “Chapter 11 is how you reshape and restructure a company that has problems. It doesn’t indicate anything nefarious or even bad management.”

By filing for Chapter 11 bankruptcy, the corporation is allowed to continue running while restructuring and reducing its debt. By allowing the business to continue, employees still have their jobs and the business is still making money. Corporate debts still need to be repaid but they may be reduced. The corporation must develop a repayment plan and corporate budget. All must be approved by the creditors and by the bankruptcy court.
The purpose is to “save” the business, as opposed to other forms of bankruptcy which would liquidate the company, said Michael Venditto, a partner at the ReedSmith law firm who has extensive experience with Chapter 11.
A sharp contrast of corporate bankruptcies is found in the airline industry. If you’re foolish enough to bash Trump for keeping the businesses open through reorganization bankruptcy, perhaps you’re just confused.
Aloha Airlines filed Chapter 7 bankruptcy in 2008, ceasing operations, leaving passengers stranded and many ‘out in the cold’ with tickets they had already purchased? Chapter 7 is what happens when the business is liquidated and closed, most unsecured debts don’t get paid and the secured-lenders get pennies on the dollar, if anything.
Maybe you thought Trump did that?

By contrast, Delta, United and American Airlines have all filed chapter 11 bankruptcy in the past 15 years. All three are now impressively profitable and employee a total of 246,000 people. So if you think we should judge any executive who took those three airlines through rough market turmoil and reorganization, which ultimately saved them from liquidation (chapter 7) bankruptcy, then you are foolish.

Trump doesn’t deny that four of his hundreds of businesses have filed for bankruptcy. He argues, however, that filing for bankruptcy is a common business decision, and he was smart to make the moves when he did.

 

“Out of hundreds of deals — hundreds — on four occasions, I’ve taken advantage of the laws of this country, like other people,” he said. “The difference is, when somebody else uses those laws, nobody writes about it. When I use it, it’s like, ‘Oh, Trump, Trump, Trump.’ The fact is, I built a net worth of more than $10 billion. I have a great, great company. I employ thousands of people. And I’m very proud of the job I did.”

Because this dead horse keeps getting beaten, let’s look at Trump’s four bankruptcies. And the opinions of some finance experts, who say Trump is correct that Chapter 11 reorganization is not always the result of bad business decisions.

 

Bankruptcy 1: The Trump Taj Mahal, 1991

Trump’s first corporate bankruptcy, for the Trump Taj Mahal, was the one that stung the most. It was also the only time at which his personal finances were at stake.

Trump first got his hands on the property in 1988 as part of a deal involving media mogul Merv Griffin. Trump ceded his controlling interest of Atlantic City hotel-casino company Resorts International Inc. to Griffin in exchange for ownership of the Taj Mahal. The casino opened in 1990 to enormous fanfare, including an appearance by pop star Michael Jackson, who Trump called his friend and a “tremendous talent.”

He funded the construction of the $1 billion Trump Taj Mahal casino in Atlantic City, which opened in 1990. By 1991, the casino was nearly $3 billion in debt, while Trump had racked up nearly $900 million in personal liabilities, so the business decided to file for Chapter 11 reorganization, according to the New York Times. As a result, Trump gave up half his personal stake in the casino and sold his yacht and airline, according to the Washington Post.

The Times  reported that Trump faced about $900 million in personal liabilities, which he reduced to about $550 million by the end of the year. The ordeal led to the sale of his Trump Princess Yacht and Trump Shuttle airline.

It provided an important lesson as well. Ted Connolly, a Boston Bankruptcy attorney who studied Trump for his book The Road Out of Debt: Bankruptcy and Other Solutions to Your Financial Problems, told TheStreet in an August interview that the first bankruptcy was a learning experience for Trump.

“The first business bankruptcy, he had a lot of personal liabilities, guarantees on the business debt, which would have wiped him out,” Connolly said. “What he did was leverage the amount of business debt to negotiate away his personal liability. And from that, he learned not to put his personal wealth at risk anymore. And so in the next three, he didn’t have any personal guarantees.”

Through the ordeal was bruising for Trump, one person involved in the case said his brand and persona helped him to retain more equity than he might have otherwise. And in true Trump fashion, he denied being too concerned about the issue anyway.

“You’ll never see me sitting in the corner sucking my thumb,” Trump told BusinessWeek at the time. “The name Trump will be hotter than ever.”

 

Bankruptcy 2: Trump Plaza Hotel, 1992

Trump seems to have had an inkling from the get-go that the Plaza deal may not have been the best he ever made .

“I haven’t purchased a building, I have purchased a masterpiece — the Mona Lisa,” he wrote in a 1988 essay in New York magazine. “For the first time in my life, I have knowingly made a deal which was not economic — for I can never justify the price I paid, no matter how successful The Plaza becomes.”

Trump acquired the Plaza Hotel in New York for $390 million in 1988. By November, 1992, the hotel had accumulated $550 million in debt. As a result of the bankruptcy, in exchange for easier terms on which to pay off the debts, Trump relinquished a 49 percent stake in the Plaza to a total of six lenders, according to ABC News.

A month later, federal bankruptcy judge Prudence Abraham approved a plan for Trump to reorganize more than $550 million in debt.

As part of the restructuring and to receive easier payment terms, he gave a 49% stake in the property to Citibank (CGet Report) and five other lenders. He kept his post as chief executive — without pay — and no longer had a role in the day-to-day operations of the luxury hotel.

 

Bankruptcy 3: Trump Hotels and Casinos Resorts, 2004

Trump Hotels and Casinos Resorts filed for bankruptcy again in 2004 when his casinos — including the Trump Taj Mahal, Trump Marina and Trump Plaza casinos in Atlantic City and a riverboat casino in Indiana — had accrued an estimated $1.8 billion in debt, according to the Associated Press. Trump agreed to reduce his share in the company from 47 to 27 percent in a restructuring plan, but he was still the company’s largest single shareholder and remained in charge of its operations.

The third bankruptcy didn’t appear to bruise Trump’s ego. At the end of the year, he said in an interview that the Trump brand was bigger than Pepsi (PEPGet Report) andCoca-Cola (KOGet Report) and emphasized that Atlantic City was just a drop in the bucket for him. “The casinos represent less than 1% of my net worth, OK?” he said. “I’m doing something that, frankly, if someone else did it, it wouldn’t even be a story.”

 

Bankruptcy 4: Trump Entertainment Resorts, 2009

Trump Entertainment Resorts — formerly Trump Hotels and Casinos Resorts — was hit hard by the 2008 economic recession and missed a $53.1 million bond interest payment in December 2008, according to ABC News. After debating with the company’s board of directors, Trump resigned as the company’s chairman and had his corporate stake in the company reduced to 10 percent. The company continued to use Trump’s name in licensing.

So four Trump companies filed for Chapter 11 reorganization. Is that as big a deal as Jeb Bush, Marco Rubio, Carly Fiorina and Ted Cruz said?

Risky business

While it would be better to avoid a situation where Chapter 11 reorganization is necessary, filing for bankruptcy can be a “sound business decision” when the company is facing serious financial problems, Venditto said. It’s better than the business shutting down completely.

“However, the source of the financial problems varies from case to case,” he said. “Sometimes it is the result of circumstances beyond the control of the business. Sometime it caused by poor judgment. More frequently, it is a combination.”

Trump’s four bankruptcies all happened within the past 25 years. That’s a lot, said Stephen Lubben, a leading expert in corporate finance and professor at Seton Hall School of Law. But to be fair, the gaming industry has been struggling the past few years, he added, and three out of four of Trump’s bankruptcies were tied to casinos.

It’s not fair to put all the blame on Trump for the four bankruptcies because he’s acting as any investor would. Investors often own many non-integrated companies, which they fund by taking on debt, and some of them inevitably file for bankruptcy, said Adam Levitin, a law professor at Georgetown University.

He added that people typically wouldn’t personally blame former Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney or investor Warren Buffett for individual failures within their investment companies, Bain Capital and Berkshire Hathaway, respectively.

“The only difference is that Trump puts his name on his companies, which means people associate them with him, but he’s not at all the leader in the bankruptcy space,” Levitan said. “These bankruptcies were not defining moments for Trump and shouldn’t color our view of him.”

“Filing bankruptcy” is taking advantage of  existing laws.

It would be ludicrous not to utilize a law that is available to you, either as a business or as an individual.

For example, many states have laws that allow for a “cooling off” period after purchasing something, like a vehicle.  You are allowed to cancel the contract within a certain number of hours after the sale (usually 48-72 hours).

If you changed your mind about a vehicle purchase, would you not use the law that allows you to return the vehicle without penalty?

Of course you would.

And if you did it, you wouldn’t describe yourself as a bad person or bad with business.

So there’s your answer…

Expect the liberals to continue this lie despite the facts.

 

Sources: The Moran Law Group, MJM Bankruptcy Law Group, et al.

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